Descendants of Joachim and Helene Wemken Koenning

“Branches and Twigs” are the descendants of our parents, grandparents, great grandparents, and great, great grandparents. At this time, I have not thoroughly researched most of these aunts, uncles and cousins. Some are deceased and other others living and our inherited photo albums held only a smattering of photos. We wish there were more to share, so if you have pictures you would like to share, please send them to me and I’ll add them to this section of the blog.

Adolph Henry Koenning was born on October 3, 1881, in Shiner, Lavaca County, Texas. He married Marie “Mary” Kram on December 19, 1911, Shiner. They had three children, Victor, Gertrude and Melvin. He died on November 28, 1948, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, at the age of 66 and was buried in Mission Park South in San Antonio.

Grave Marker for Adolph Koenning, Mission Park South, San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.

 

 Frieda Sophie Koenning was born about 1885, in Shiner, Lavaca County, Texas. She married Hugo S. Onken in 1909, and they had one son, Arthur. She died about 1963 at the age of 78 in Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas, and was buried in the Nordheim Cemetery in DeWitt County, Texas.

Grave Marker for Frieda Koenning Onken, Nordheim Cemetery, DeWitt County, Texas.

 

Henry Aloysis Koenning was born on July 12, 1886, in Schulenburg, Fayette County, Texas. He married Anna Sabrina Ida Kram in 1914. They have two children, Milton and Evelyn Helen Margaret. He died on March 7, 1966, in Lakeside, San Diego County, California, at the age of 79 and was buried in the Greenwood Cemetery in Lakeside.

Grave Marker for Henry A. Koenning, Greenwood Cemetery, Lakeside, San Diego County, California.

 

Louis Koenning was born April 3, 1888, in Shiner, Lavaca County, Texas. He was not married. He died November 1, 1914, in Cuero, DeWitt County, Texas, at the age of 26 and was buried in the Hillside Cemetery in Cuero.

Grave Marker for Louis Koenning, Hillside Cemetery, Cuero, DeWitt County, Texas.

 

Olga Koenning was born March 1891, in Shiner, Lavaca County, Texas. She married Henry Anton Hirsch before 1916 in Shiner, Texas. They had two children, Alvin and Lena. They divorced before 1930 and she remarried Dooley Donovan. She died on June 14, 1959, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, at the age of 68 and was buried in Mission Park South in San Antonio.

Grave Marker for Olga Koenning Donovan, Mission Park South, San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas. (Shared marker with Adolph Koenning.)

Minhelda “Minnie” Koenning was born in May 1892, in Shiner, Lavaca County, Texas. She married Fred “Fritz” Schwab in 1936. They had no children. She died on May 14, 1971, in San Francisco, San Francisco County, California, at the age of 79, and was buried in the Cypress Lawn Memorial Park in Colma, Mateo County, California.

Burial location for Minhelda “Minnie” Koenning Schwab, Cypress Lawn Memorial Park, Colma, Mateo County, California.

Rudolph Koenning was born on November 28, 1894, in Shiner, Lavaca County, Texas. He married Vada Maurine Townsend in 1917 in Lavaca County. They had two children, Ellery Rudolph “Shorty” and Maurine Vada. He died on August 29, 1984, in San Diego, San Diego County, California, at the age of 89. Burial location unknown.

Walter Paul Koenning was born on July 12 1900, in Shiner, Lavaca County, Texas. He married Ida Lee Kunoth in 1923. They had three children, Welborne Paul “Wes,” Eddie Lee and Doris. He died on August 10, 1958, in Bexar County, Texas, at the age of 58, and was buried in Sunset Memorial Park in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.

Burial location for Walter Paul Koenning, Sunset Memorial Park, San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.

 

MORE BRANCHES AND TWIGS

Adolph Koenning with sons, Vic and Mel.
Victor “Vic” Koenning
Melvin “Mel” Koenning
Adolph “Little Granddad” with granddaughter, Cynthia Croft.
Henry Aloysis Koenning
Henry and Anna Sabrina Koenning on their wedding day.
Adolph and Mary’s children, Vic, Gertrude and Mel.
Vic, Gertrude and Mel Koenning
Eddie Lee Koenning
Ellery “Shorty” Koenning with wife, Doodle, June 2003.
Vic Jr. with grandson, Coleman.

Descendants of George and Ethel Calk LeBus

“Branches and Twigs” are the descendants of our parents, grandparents, great grandparents and great, great grandparents. At this time, I have not thoroughly researched most of these aunts, uncles and cousins. Some are deceased and others are living and our inherited photo albums held only a smattering of photos. We wish there were more to share, so if you have pictures you would like to share, please send them to me and I’ll add them to this section of the blog.

 

Franklin “Frank” LeyBurn LeBus

Franklin “Frank” Leyburn LeBus born September 9, 1900, in Bonham, Fannin County, Texas. He married Thelma Ruth Henderson about 1919. They had two children, Frank Leyburn, Jr. and Eleanor Raye. Frank and Thelma Ruth were divorced, and he remarried Alice Imogene “Genie” Cox after 1930. They had one son, Jack “Jackson” Glen. Frank died on November 7, 1972 in Longview, Harrison County, Texas, at the age of 72 and was buried in the Memory Park Cemetery in Longview.

 

Hazel Annabelle LeBus Grizzle

Hazel Annabelle LeBus was born January 23, 1902, in Bonham, Fannin County, Texas. She married Homer Grizzle on July 3, 1921. They had three children, Margaret Ann, Gloria Gene and George Homer. She died on September 8, 1981, in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas, at the age of 79 and was buried in the Crestview Memorial Park in Wichita Falls.

 

Archie Carlisle LeBus Nance

Archie Carlisle LeBus was born December 1, 1904, in Bonham, Fannin County, Texas. She married Bennett Allen Nance on January 1, 1925, in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas. They had five children, Aileen, Dan Allen, Nancy, Lucy Ann and Steven Anthony. She died August 5, 1987, in Harlingen, Cameron County, Texas, at the age of 82 and was buried in the Sunset Cemetery, Mountain Home, Kerr County, Texas.

 

Jack Blackburn LeBus

Jack Blackburn LeBus was born April 17, 1906, in Madill, Marshall County, Oklahoma. He married Nora Iona Neeley on March 1, 1938. They had four children, JoAnn, Jacqueline, Jerry Blackburn and James “Jim” Franklin. He died on July 19, 1938, in Greenville, Hunt County, Texas at the age of 32 and was buried in the Riverside Cemetery in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas.

 

Irene Clementine LeBus Bilbrey

Irene Clementine LeBus was born February 17, 1908, in Madill, Marshall County, Oklahoma. She married Paul Bilbrey October 16, 1927. They had two children, Don Gene and Paula. She died June 21, 1983, in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas, at the age of 75 and was buried in the Crestview Memorial Park in Wichita Falls.

 

Roy Henderson LeBus was born April 10, 1910, in Henrietta, Clay County, Texas. He married Lavena Mae Taylor on October 16, 1929. They had four children, Roy Taylor, George Richard, John Thomas “Tommy” and Sally. He died on Jan 14, 2000, in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas, at the age of 89.

 

Laura V LeBus Knight

Laura V. LeBus was born on January 28, 1913, in Henrietta, Clay County, Texas. She married Milton E. Dietert in 1931. They were divorced. She married Clarence Denton “C.D,” and they had three children, Francille, Hazel Emilie and Lynda. She died on November 25, 1996, in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas, at the age of 83.

 

George Franklin “G.F.” LeBus, Jr.

George Franklin LeBus, Jr. was born May 10, 1917, in Electra, Wichita County, Texas. He married Louise Latham on June 28, 1937. They had three sons, George Franklin III, James Latham and Joe Ballard. He died on July 25, 1990, in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas.

 

Ethel Marie LeBus Morrow

Ethel Marie LeBus was born August 6, 1919, in Electra, Wichita County, Texas. She married Thrall Shelton in about 1936. They were divorced before 1940. She married Denzil Bane Morrow in 1940 and they had three children, Ethel June, Pamela and Denzil Bane “Denny,” Jr. She died on November 23, 2010 in Cedar Park, Williamson County, Texas.

Donavel Calk LeBus was born on March 13, 1925 and died on May 22, 1925.

 

MORE BRANCHES AND TWIGS

George and Ethel LeBus with their children. (Seated L-R) Archie, Ma LeBus, Hazel, Irene. (Standing L-R) Laura V, Frank, Pa LeBus, Roy, G.F. and Ethel Marie.
Ma LeBus and daughters, Hazel, Archie, Irene, Laura V, Ethel Marie.
Ma LeBus with her daughters. (Seated L-R) Hazel, Ma LeBus, Archie. (Standing L-R) Ethel Marie, Irene and Laura V.

George and Ethel celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on November 5, 1949 at the Wichita Falls Country Club. Here are a few photos taken on that very special occasion.

Grandsons, Frank Jr., George Richard, Dan Allen, John Shannon, Don Gene.
George and Ethel’s granddaughters, Francille, Jacqueline, Emilie, Lucy, Ethel June, Eleanor Raye, JoAnn, Nancy, Unknown, Eunice, Unknown.
George and Ethel’s children and Kentucky LeBus relatives.

Pa and Ma LeBus’ Grandchildren

 

Margaret Ann and Gloria, daughters of Homer and Hazel LeBus Grizzle.
Dan Allen Nance
Roy Taylor LeBus
Frank Jr. and Eleanor Raye LeBus
Bennett Nance with children, Nancy and Dan; nephews, Roy Taylor and George Richard LeBus.
Nancy Nance
Francille Knight and Ethel June Morrow
Lucy Ann Nance
Emilie Knight
Lynda Knight
Sally LeBus
Paula Bilbrey
Cousins, Dan Nance and George Homer Grizzle.
George Franklin LeBus III
Joe Ballard LeBus
Steven Anthony Nance
Tommy LeBus

Descendants of William and Alice Caulk Croft

“Branches and Twigs” are descendants of our parents, grandparents, great grandparents and great, great grandparents. At this time, I have not thoroughly researched most of these aunts, uncles and cousins. Some are deceased and others living and our inherited photo albums held only a smattering of photos. We wish there were more to share, so if you have any pictures you would like to share, please send them to me and I’ll add them to this section of the blog.

 

Croft family (Seated R to L) William and Alice Croft, Oscar Cameron, Paul Harold, Vede Weaver. George Allen, Edna Ruth. (Standing R to L) Fred Dewey, Frank Monroe, Floyd Ward, Grace Irene, Blanche Marie, Hope Cansada and Russell William

Oscar Cameron Croft was the first child of William and Alice Croft. He was born on June 19, 1887, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. He married Ethel Mae Mohler on October 5, 1910, in York County, Nebraska. They had two sons, Lloyd Ollie (1913-1987) and Keith Lyle (1920-1997), both born in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. Oscar died April 19, 1952, in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas, at the age of 64. He was buried in the Mission Burial Park South, in San Antonio.

 

Paul Harold Croft was born on June 20, 1890, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. He married Marie L. Lewis on January 1, 1913. They had three children, Lewis Allen, Helen Paula, and Lois Elaine. Paul died March 8, 1971, in Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington, at the age of 80. He was buried in the Mountain View Memorial Park in Lakewood, Pierce County, Washington.

 

Vede “Vida” Weaver Croft was born on August 28, 1892, in Fairfield, Clay, Nebraska. He married Opal Jenny Wolford on March 11, 1916. They had two children, Harold Ward and Harry. Vede died on October 25, 1977, in Glen Aubrey, Broome County, New York, at the age of 85. He was buried in the Glen Aubrey Cemetery.

 

George Allen Croft was born on March 20, 1894, in Fairfield, Clay, Nebraska. He married Lena Esther Houston on March 15, 1916. They had two children, Iris Gwendolyn and George Allen, Jr. George died April 21, 1979, in Independence, Jackson County, Missouri, at the age of 85. He was buried in the Elmwood Cemetery in Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri.

 

Edna Ruth Croft was born October 27, 1895, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. She married Merle Lee Durfee on September 22, 1915, in York, Nebraska. They had two daughters, Doris Winifred and Donna Lee. Edna died on December 29, 1985, in Washington, Washington County, Kansas, at the age of 90. She was buried in the Washington Cemetery.

 

Fred Dewey “Fritz or Doc” Croft was born on July 27, 1898, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. He married Isabel Roth on August 19, 1925. They had two children, Fred and Betty Lou. Fred died on November 14, 1988, in Glen Aubrey, Broome County, New York at the age of 90. He was buried in the Glen Aubrey Cemetery.

 

Frank Monroe Croft was born October 21, 1900, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. He married Gladys Scott in 1925. They had four children, Duane Monroe, Mildred Jean, Jeannine, and Cecile. Frank died on March 16, 1952, in Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California at the age of 51. He was buried in the Grand View Memorial Park in Glendale, Los Angeles County, California.

 

Floyd Ward Croft was born on January 2, 1903, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. He married Erma Woolen in 1929. They had three children, Thelma, Shirley and David Gene. Floyd died on January 7, 1963, in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon, at the age of 60. He was buried in the Lincoln Memorial Park in Portland.

Grace Irene Croft was born on June 2, 1904, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. She married Alfred Montgomery on June 11, 1924. They had eight children: LeRhee Delores, Willis Dean, Myron Leroy, Alton Leon, Ronald Jay, Claude Delmar, Bruce Alfred and Orville Ray. After her husband’s death, Grace married for the second time to Francis Kelly in October 1972. They had no children. She died on September 19, 1990, in Prosser, Benton County, Washington and was buried in the Prosser Cemetery.

 

Blanche Marie Croft born on March 17, 1906, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. She married Fred Mumford on June 2, 1928. They had three children, Darlene, Donald, and Joan Elaine. Blanche died in 2000 in Boulder, Boulder County, Colorado, at the age of 94. She was buried in Mountain View Cemetery in Longmont, Boulder County, Colorado.

 

Hope Cansada Croft was born March 20, 1907, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. She married William E. Thompson on April 16, 1927. They had five children, Eugene, Virgil, Merial, Mary and Lena. Hope died on November 3, 1930 in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon at the age of 89. She was buried in the Douglass Oregon Historic Cemetery in Troutdale, Multnomah County, Oregon.

 

Russell William Croft was born on December 11, 1908, in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. He married Mary Ann Ross on February 20, 1930 and they had one daughter, Donna Mae. Russell died on January 31, 1980, in Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, at the age of 71. He was buried in the Moore Cemetery in Arlington, Tarrant County, Texas.

 

MORE BRANCHES AND TWIGS

For many years, a Croft family reunion was held in Kansas City, Missouri. Here are several photos taken at two of these gatherings.

Croft reunion in Kansas City, Missouri, probably in the 1950’s.
Eight children of William and Alice Croft. Reunion in Kansas City, Missouri about 1960.
Croft reunion in Kansas City, about 1960.
Ethel and Oscar Croft, San Antonio, Texas.
Four generations of Croft men – William holding L.K. and Lloyd and Oscar standing.
Trudy and Lloyd, February 1945.
Cousins L.K., Cynthia, Richard and Mike Croft.
Gertrude with children, L.K. and Cynthia, about 1950.
Keith and Mildred Croft with sons, Richard, Mike and John.
Mike and Susan Croft with children and grandchildren.

 

Descendants of George and Lucinda “Lucy” Woodward Nance

“Branches and Twigs” are the descendants of our parents, grandparents, great grandparents and great, great grandparents. At this time, I have not thoroughly researched most of these aunts, uncles and cousins. Some are deceased and others are living and our inherited family photo albums held only a smattering of photos. We wish there were more to share, so if you have any pictures you would like to share, please send them to me and I’ll add them to this section of the blog.

 

Willie Mae/May Nance Fisher

Willie Mae/May Nance was George and Lucy’s first child. She was born January 28, 1891 in Hallettsville, Lavaca County, Texas. She married Arthur “Doc” Fisher on January 12, 1910 in Electra, Wichita County, Texas. They had three children, Maxine Lucille (1911-1998), Ruth Marie (1914-2006) and David Arthur (1920-1966). Willie Mae died on June 24, 1932 in Electra, Wichita County, Texas at the age of 41.

 

Gladys with son, Harry Nance Hager.

Gladys Gertrude Nance was born August 10, 1892, in Hallettsville, Lavaca County, Texas. She married Harry Bateman Hager on June 11, 1914, in Electra, Wichita County, Texas. They had two sons, Harry Nance (1917-1978) and Weldon Bennett (1919-1993). Gladys died August 23, 1990, in Canyon, Randall County, Texas, at the age of 98 and was buried in the Rosedale Cemetery, Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma.

 

Norma Dell Nance Beeker

Norma Dell Nance was born in March 1894, in Hallettsville, Lavaca County, Texas. She married Samuel Fred Beeker on April 20, 1915, in Electra, Wichita County, Texas. They had two children, Sammy Lane (1919-2005) and Murray (1923-2003). Norma died on November 30, 1976, in Brownsville, Cameron County, Texas, at the age of 82.

 

George and Lucille Nance

 George Edison “Brother” Nance was born January 3, 1896, in Lavaca County, Texas. He married Bessie Lucille Parker on October 1, 1924. They had no children. He died November 4, 1954, in Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, at the age of 58 and was buried in the Dreamland Cemetery, Canyon, Randall County, Texas.

 

Sadie Ann Nance Oliver

Sadie Ann Nance was born on July 5, 1897, in Sweet Home, Lavaca County, Texas. She married William Thomas “W.T.” Oliver on May 24, 1917, in Lockney, Floyd County, Texas. They had five children, Helene “Elaine,” Shirley Ann, Martha Dell, George Sanders and John E., II. She died on August 17, 1992, in Amarillo, Cameron County, Texas, at the age of 95 and was buried in the Llano Cemetery Mausoleum, Amarillo, Potter County, Texas.

 

Bennett Allen Nance

Bennett Allen Nance was born on December 23, 1901, in Charco, Goliad County, Texas. He married Archie Carlisle LeBus on January 1, 1925, in Wichita, Wichita County, Texas. They had five children, Aileen (1926-1926), Dan Allen, Nancy, Lucy Ann and Steven Anthony. He died on February 17, 1994, in Kerrville, Kerr County, Texas, and was buried in the Sunset Cemetery, Mountain Home, Kerr County, Texas, at the age of 92.

 

John Allison “Al” Nance

John Allison “Al” Nance was born September 18, 1903, in Charco, Goliad County, Texas. He married Rosetta Casey on June 28, 1929, in Uvalde, Uvalde County, Texas. They had three children, John Allison II “Jan”(1932-19952), Larry Lewis (1934-2007) and Susan. He died on December 13, 1972, in Kerrville, Kerr County, Texas, and was buried at the Leakey Cemetery in Leakey, Real County, Texas.

 

MORE BRANCHES AND TWIGS

Bennett Nance with baby son, Dan.
Dan Allen Nance
Nancy Nance
Lucy Ann Nance
Susan Nance with cousin, Steve.
George, Mama Nance, Bennett and Steve Nance. (Standing) Lucy, Tom Boothe, Nancy Nance Boothe, Lucille, Eunice Smith Nance, Dan and Archie Nance.
Bennett Nance with sons, Steve and Dan.
Nance family reunion about 1954 in Brownsville, TX. (Standing L-R) Larry Nance, Harry Nance Hager, Bennett Nance, W.T. Oliver, George Nance, Harry Hager, Al Nance, David Fisher, Tres Overton, Steve Nance. (Seated L-R) Susan Nance, Lucy Ann Nance, Charlene Nance, Maxine Williams, Archie Nance, Sadie Oliver, Norma Beeker, Mama Nance, Gladys Hager, Rosetta Nance, Margery Fisher, Sammy Lane Overton, Ruth Marie Jarrell.
Mr. and Mrs. David Fisher
Sammy Lane Beeker Overton
David Arthur Fisher

 

George Sanders “Sandy” Oliver
John Allison II “Jan” Nance

                                        Dan Allen Nance

Nancy Nance
Larry Lewis Nance
Steven Anthony Nance
Lucy Ann Nance
Susan Nance with husband, Jerry Knight.
Bennett and Archie celebrate 50th anniversary with children, Dan, Lucy, Nancy and Steve.
Dan and Eunice Nance with children, Denise and Ben.
Tom and Nancy Nance Boothe with children, Hank, George and Bennett.
L.K. and Lucy Nance Croft with children, Leslie, Lyle and Lloyd.
Steve and Paula Nance with daughter, Stephanie.
Denise Nance
Ben Nance

 

 

 

Andrew Morandus and Margaret Simington LeBus

Andrew Morandus LeBus

Andrew Morandus LeBus came to America with his family from Alsace, France which is located on the eastern border of France on the west bank of the Rhine. It is adjacent to Germany and Switzerland, so it abounds in both French and German influences. Our LeBus ancestors resided in Alsace during the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, years when its citizens were subjected to a number of conflicts greatly affecting their lives and wellbeing. When Andrew was born July 14, 1826 in Largitzen, Alsace, France, the country was recovering from foreign occupation. A dramatic surge in population growth caused an economic depression resulting in hunger, housing shortages and lack of work. This may have been the reason for the LeBus family immigrating to America. (Click link – Letter to Frank LeBus)

Andrew was either the first or second child of Seraphin and Marieanna “Anne” Hubschwerlen LeBus. We have some documentation of this family in a transcription of Seraphin’s will dated 14th day of April A.D. 1868. Their four sons, Morandus, Lewis, Francis Joseph and Anthony along with two daughters, Anne Swaney and Mary Ewing are mentioned. They may have had two other daughters (Marieanna and Teresa) who died as infants but we have no information documenting that. (Click link – Last Will and Testament of Seraphin LeBus)

Even though I have not located this LeBus family on a passenger list or found a naturalization record for Seraphin, I am led to believe they immigrated to America between 1826 and 1831, after Andrew’s birth. Their son Anthony LeBus was born April 11, 1828, and census records for him give his birth place as France and Pennsylvania, so that muddies the water a bit. Daughter Anne LeBus was born January 9, 1831, in Columbiana County, Ohio.

SERAPHIN LEBUS FAMILY SETTLE IN OHIO

Andrew’s father, Seraphim Labes, can be found in the 1840 United States Federal Census living in Hanover, Columbiana, Ohio with a household consisting of nine people. (Note misspelling of name.) The 1840 census gives only the name of the head of household with age ranges for other members of the household. Listed are one male and one female under five years old; one male and two females between the ages of five and nine; two males between the ages of ten and fourteen; one male between the ages of thirty and thirty-nine; and one female between the ages of seventy and seventy-nine. Seraphin’s wife Anne died in April 1, 1839, so perhaps the older female was her mother.

Andrew Morandus LeBus married Margaret Simington in 1845 and they are recorded on the 1850 United States Federal Census living in Smith, Mahoning, Ohio, with their two children, Mary A. (Ann) age four and Thomas C. age one. The name is incorrectly spelled as Labus. Andrew’s given birthplace is France. Margaret and children were born in Ohio.

ANDREW, MARGARET AND FAMILY MOVE TO ILLINOIS

By 1860 the LeBus family had moved to Wayne County, Illinois, and five more children were added to the household – John, George, Jackson, Ida and Nancy. Andrew’s given occupation was blacksmith. Unfortunately, I have no data or family lore that explains when they moved to Illinois or the reason for their move. Several of his siblings moved to Kentucky but none to Illinois. The years leading up to the Civil War were a turbulent time in America, so perhaps it played a part in the family’s move.

I have not found a record showing Andrew was enlisted in the military, but like all people at that time, he and his family must have been impacted by it. Here is an excerpt from an article from USGenWeb Archives entitled, “Life in Wayne County during the Civil War, Wayne County, Illinois.”

 When the call reached Wayne County there was great excitement. All the loyal men hurriedly met to make plans to go to Mt. Vernon to enlist. But first, they must decide how their families should be cared for and protected during their absence.

They agreed that those with some physical disability and the few physicians should remain to protect and defend the homes and families if it should be necessary. Also, the crops must be put in for food and it would require some who were able bodied to organize the young boys and girls and plant and care for each farm.

At this time, many of the community sympathized with the Southerners and they called a meeting and organized a society called ‘The Knights of the Golden Circle’ to act as spies against the Northern men, and hinder them in every way possible and to give assistance to the Southern Army…

To combat this marauding society, the Union League was organized. A meeting was called at the home of Syria J. Branson and by unanimous vote he was elected to be captain of the League.

This gives us a glimpse of the chaotic atmosphere. The Civil War was being waged between states and within communities. We have heard about families and family members turning against each other, and that must have been the case in Wayne County, Illinois. It makes me wonder how Andrew reacted to this situation. Was he a supporter of the Union or the Confederacy?

When the 1870 United States Federal Census was conducted, Andrew and his family had moved to Flora, Illinois, and they had three more children – Lydia (7), Lincoln (5) and Joseph (1). Their son Jackson was not listed so I think he died before 1870. Andrew and his three sons, John, Thomas and George, all give “blacksmith” as occupations. One interesting note is that Andrew gave his place of birth as Pennsylvania. I have no idea why this occurred since in other census records he gave France.

Andrew and Margaret remained in Flora, Illinois for the remainder of their lives. They had one more daughter, Margaret “Maggie” Jane, born in 1871. One the 1900 United States Federal Census we find information that they had eleven children, three of which died before 1900. Andrew was continuing his work as a blacksmith along with his son Joseph. This son, along with his wife and three daughters, lived with Andrew and Margaret.

Andrew died August 1, 1900, and is buried in the Elmwood Cemetery in Clay County, Illinois.

Other than census records and death information, I have little data about Margaret Simington LeBus. She was born May 3, 1826, in Columbiana County, Ohio. Census records give Ireland as the birth place of her father and Ohio for her mother. Of course there are no names of parents.

Margaret died February 28, 1913 in Flora, Illinois. Like her husband she is buried in the Elmwood Cemetery, Clay County, Illinois. The following is an excerpt from her obituary appearing in The Southern Illinois Record, March 6, 1913. The obituary and burial information can also be located on the Find A Grave website, Memorial number 32539952.

Mrs. Lebus was converted and became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Dungano, O., at the age of fourteen years and remained a faithful member till called to the church on high.

Mrs. Lebus and her husband were charter members of the Flora M. E. Church and bore a full share in the erection of the present church edifice. They were interested and helpful factors in all the work of the church.

The present generation is greatly indebted to the fathers and mothers gone before who by their toils and sacrifices laid the foundation, stimulated the growth and made possible the religious privileges of the present.

Today we honor the name and pay a tribute of affection to one of these pioneers, now called to her eternal reward. It is ours to carry on the unfinished task, while she rests from her labors…

The death of Mrs. Lebus removes from Flora another one of its oldest and most highly respected pioneer citizens. She was a woman of strong character, loyal and true to her church, her friends and all good work.

Sources

Ancestry.com. 1840 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.

Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.

Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.

Ancestry.com. and The Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA.: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2004.

Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2006.

Hbschweriaen, Eugene, Correspondence with Frank LeBus, February 8, 1937, Largitzen, France.

LeBus, Seraphin, Last Will and Testament of Seraphin LeBus, Transcription, April 14, 1868, Columbiana, Ohio.

Web: Illinois, Find A Grave Index, 1809-2012 http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=Web

Written by Lucy Ann Nance Croft, 2014

Andrew M. LeBus Pedigree Chart (click link) Andrew M. LeBus Pedigree Chart

Andrew M. LeBus Family Group Sheet (click link) Andrew M. LeBus FGS – Document

 

Allen Monroe and Cansada Jones Caulk

Allen Monroe Caulk was born November 11, 1831 in Macoupin County Illinois. He was the sixth child of James Patterson and Sarah Powers Caulk. This large pioneer family migrated from Tennessee to Illinois about 1829.

I first located Allen Monroe Caulk on a marriage record showing that he and Racheal Sackett wed on September 5, 1850 in Montgomery County, Illinois (adjacent to Macaupin County). A son, George Washington, was born October 13, 1835, but their marriage must have broken up after that. The 1860 United States Federal Census shows Allen living in the household of James Kykendoll and working as a farm laborer. Also, when he enlists in the Union army, July 25, 1861, he states he is single. I have found no divorce record.

As previously stated, Allen enlisted in the Union army July 25, 1861. He was in the 7th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Company D and was ranked as private. He served three years and was discharged July 29, 1864 when his term of service had expired.

Military record for Allen M. Caulk. Caulk was a private in the Union army from July 25, 1861 until his term of service expired July 29, 1864.

ALLEN MARRIES WIDOW CANSADA JONES CISCO

After his time in the military, Allen remained in Montgomery County, and during that time, he met a widow named Cansada Jones Cisco. She had been widowed twice, once in 1861, and again, in 1865. Her first husband was Samuel Stokes and her second was William Cisco. She had one son with each husband, Jasper Stokes and Joseph Cisco. Allen and Cansada married on September 6, 1866.

Marriage record for Allen M. Caulk and Causada Cisco.

Cansada Jones was born October 12, 1842 in Tennessee and was the daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Sneed Jones. Like the Caulk family, they migrated to Illinois, probably in the 1850’s.

When the 1870 United States Federal Census was taken, Allen and Cansada are living in Bear Creek, Montgomery County, Illinois. Along with Cansada’s two sons, Jasper and Joseph, they have two more children, Alice (5) and Albert (2). Allen’s mother, Sarah, was also living with them.

During the following ten years, the Caulk family expanded “its ranks.” By 1880 the census shows they have five more children. The name on the census is mistakenly recorded as “Cork.” Listed are: A.M. Cork (48), Cansada (37), Joseph W. (16), Alice (13), Albert (11), Theodosia (9), Arthur (7), Rosette (4), Lillie (2) and Sarah (8m). The family resided in Seminary, Fayette County, Illinois, northwest of Montgomery County.

THE CAULK FAMILY MOVES TO NEBRASKA

Sometime before 1885, Allen and Cansada left Illinois and moved west to Nebraska. He was located on the Nebraska State Census, 1885, in Lone Tree, Clay County. Lone Tree was a prairie town located in the south central part of the state. I do not know their reasons for the move with their large family, but it could not have been an easy journey. Following is a bit of information that lends some insight into the reasons people were drawn to Nebraska.

During the 1870s to the 1880s, Nebraska experienced a large growth in population. Several factors contributed to attracting new residents. The first was that the vast prairie land was perfect for cattle grazing. This helped settlers to learn the unfamiliar geography of the area. The second factor was the invention of several farming technologies. Agricultural inventions such as barbed wire, wind mills, and the steel plow, combined with good weather, enabled settlers to make use of Nebraska as prime farming land. By the 1880s, Nebraska’s populations had soared to more than 450,000 people. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nebraska) By 1900, Allen and Cansada’s household had greatly diminished. The census record shows they have only two children living with them, a son, Henry (19), and a daughter, Bertha (15). However, I think the ages are incorrectly recorded. Later census records for them give their birthdates as – Henry, 1881 and Bertha, 1884. Evidently, the ages on the 1900 census should be Henry, 9 and Bertha, 5. All of the older children had married and established homes of their own.

Note: On the 1900 census, Cansada gives information that she was mother of twelve children and only eleven were living. I was not able to determine who the twelfth child was or when he or she was born. There was an Edna Pearly Caulk, born November 23, 1886 in Fairfield, Nebraska and died October 20, 1895 in Benton County, Arkansas. Her grave marker in the Decatur, Arkansas Cemetery has the inscription which says she was the daughter of A.M. . and C. Caulk. Could this be the unidentified daughter? If so, what was she doing in Arkansas?

Allen farmed for many years, but by 1910, he was retired, and he and Cansada lived in the town of Lone Tree. The 1910 United States Federal Census shows they were living in a house with two boarders, John and Jamas Bell, and a servant, Ena Jones. At this time, several of their children were also living in Clay County, so they had family to keep them company. Their daughter, Alice, and her husband, William, had thirteen children, so there were many grandchildren nearby.

Allen Monroe Caulk died on December 3, 1913 in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska. His death certificate gives the cause of death was acute bronchitis. He was survived by his wife of 47 years, Cansada, ten children and one stepson. Allen was buried in the Fairfield Cemetery.

Following Allen’s death, Cansada remained in Fairfield. The next year she married for the fourth time to a widower named Michael Sweeley. He also had a number of children; so undoubtedly, they enjoyed and shared their sixteen years of marriage surrounded by their large families. Cansada died December 24, 1930 in Fairfield, Clay County, Nebraska and was buried beside Allen Monroe Caulk.

Grave marker for Allen and Cansada Caulk.
Grave marker for Allen and Cansada Caulk.

Sources

Allen Monroe Caulk, death certificate no. 10509, Nebraska Health and Human Services System, Lincoln, Nebraska.

Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.

Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.

Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.

Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010.

Ancestry.com. Nebraska, State Census, 1885 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.

Ancestry.com. Web: Nebraska, Find A Grave Index, 1854-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp. Illinois Marriages, 1790-1860 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.

Jordan Dodd and Liahona Research, comp.. Illinois, Marriages, 1851-1900 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.

Historical Data Systems, comp. American Civil War Soldiers [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.

Montgomery County, marriage license, Montgomery County Clerk’s Office, Hillsboro, Illinois.

“Macoupin County, Illinois,” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Macoupin_County_Illinois

“Nebraska,” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nebraska

Written by Lucy Ann Nance Croft, 2015

Allen M. Caulk Pedigree Chart (click link) Allen M. Caulk Pedigree Chart Scan0001

Allen M. Caulk Family Group Sheet (click link) Allen M. Caulk FGS – Document

 

Lucy Ann Leyburn LeBus

I begin this narrative on a personal note. I was named for my paternal grandmother, Lucy Ann Woodward Nance. Much to my surprise, it was not until about 1988 that I found I had another ancestor by the name of Lucy Ann. I was perusing some of my mother’s mementos, scrapbooks, and photo albums and came across a list of her family including the names of her grandparents. There was the name of my great grandmother, Lucy Ann Leyburn LeBus. I could not believe my mother had never told me, but perhaps she did not know much about her to share.

With that being said, I make this disclaimer: Most of the information I have about Lucy Ann “Annie” Leyburn has been gleaned from the United States Federal Census records. Therefore, it was necessary for me to make some assumptions since census information does not always give us all that we want to know about a person. Another Leyburn ancestor sent me a copy of a memoir written by Lucy Ann”s sister Jennie which gave me a bit of information about their parents.

The first place I found Lucy Ann Leyburn was on the 1860 census, living with her parents and two siblings in Vigo Township, Knox County, Indiana. The census enumerator spells the name “Leyborn”. Lucy Ann was the first child of John L. and Nancy Jane Ruby Leyburn. Her age is recorded as 5 years old and birthplace was Indiana. Her two siblings were Franken I. (3) and Mary E. (1) and both were also born in Indiana. John Leyborn (29) was a carpenter and was born in Pennsylvania. Nancy Leyborn (26) was born in Indiana.

Not long after Lucy Ann’s birth the United States became engaged in the Civil War. Indiana was a part of the Union despite the fact that a large part of the population was sympathetic to the Confederate cause. I found no military record for John Leyburn but it is likely he was called upon to lend his support in some way. As all families, the Leyburns must have felt the upheaval, danger, and distress of a country at war. It is likely they had friends and family who served in the military and died in the war.

Even though I have not found the John Leyburn family on the 1870 United States Federal Census, I have this information from the memoir by Jennie Leyburn Harris (Lucy’s youngest sister).

When I was about 2 years old, my mother’s health began to fail. After the doctors had done all they could for her, they advised my father to take her south to a warmer climate. So sunny Tennessee (as it was called in the north) was thought the best place for her. My grandfather Irving, still living near Edwardsport, on hearing the doctor’s decision, would not permit my father to move until he (my grandfather) came and looked the country over. He liked Tennessee so much he came back and sold his place, and we all came together in ’73. On the eve of our departure, my older sister Anne, ran away and married so she might stay in the north – a great sorrow to my mother and father. The change, however, was not to her what my father had hoped for, and in a few months, she passed away leaving him in a strange land with his little children. He could not rise above the sorrow and loss of one he loved so dearly. She had meant so much to him, smoothing out the rough places in life.

The first years of their marriage had been very prosperous and happy, but when the years of adversity came, she met them with her same sweet and gentle manner. (Harris, pp. 2-3)

Another Leyburn family researcher, Susan Keeling, shared information that John and Nancy Leyburn had eight children, the last born in 1872. Her information shows three children were born in Edwardsport, Knox, Indiana; four born in Vincennes, Knox, Indiana, and one in Flora, Clay, Illinois. To date (2013) six names have been found – Lucy Ann, Fanny, Franklin, Mary, Willie and Jennie.

LUCY ANN MARRIES JOHN B. LEBUS

I feel safe in saying that Annie met her future husband, John Blackburn LeBus, sometime before 1872 in Flora, Clay County, Illinois. They married October 6, 1872 in Flora, Illinois. By 1874 they had started their family with the birth of a daughter, Maggie. During the next six years their family grew even more with the births of George Franklin, December 14, 1876; Archie, 1877; and Laura, 1878.

Marriage record for John B. LeBus and Lucy Ann Leyburn.

By 1880 John, Annie, and their family were living in Loudon, Tennessee. Perhaps they moved there to be near her siblings. From information on the 1880 United States Federal Census, John (listed as J.A. Lebus) is continuing his trade as a blacksmith. Along with Annie (24) the children are listed as Marie (should be Maggie), Archie, George and Leif (should be Link).This fourth child, Lincoln, was given the nickname “Link.” For some reason, their daughter Laura is not shown on the census record.

I was able to find that three of Lucy’s siblings were also living in Loudon, Tennessee at the time of the 1880 United States Federal Census. They were residing with their paternal step grandfather and grandmother listed as J.R. Irving and N.A. Irving. J.R (probably J.B.) was 72 years old, born in Scotland and was a wool manufacturer. N.A. was 72 years old and was born in Pennsylvania.

Note: After the death of John L. Leyburn’s father, his mother remarried J.B. or Benjamin Irving.

The 1890 United States Federal Census is no longer in existence. Only a few fragments survived a fire at the Commerce Department in Washington, D.C. on January 10, 1921. Neither Indiana nor Illinois have records serving as a census substitute. Therefore, there is a large span of time where I have no recorded information for John and Annie LeBus.

There is no record of when the LeBus family returned to Illinois or where they resided, but from information on the 1900 United States Federal Census, we know that three more of their children were born in Illinois. John Ervin was born December 24, 1881; Ruby was born 1886; and Goldie was born 1888.

JOHN AND ANNIE MOVE TO PERRY, OKLAHOMA

By 1900 the LeBus family is living in Perry, Noble County, Oklahoma. The family name is shown on the 1900 United States Federal Census as Labus. Listed are John B. Labus (50), Anna Labus (45), Ruby Labus (13), Golle (misspelling of Goldie, (11), Beatrice Labus (7), Irene Labus (4), and John Labus (19). Both Beatrice and Irene were born in Oklahoma.

There is an interesting bit of information found on the 1900 census. Two of the questions asked are: “Mother of how many children?” and “Number of those children living?” Annie’s answers give us information that she and John had thirteen children but only eleven living children. We have no record of the names of the other two children or the dates of birth and death.

Lucy Ann “Annie” Leyburn LeBus died July 16, 1905 in Perry, Oklahoma, and was buried beside her husband, John, in Grace Hill Cemetery (Perry, Oklahoma).

Grace Hill Cemetery
Grave marker for Lucy Ann LeBus.

Getting a glimpse into the life of my ancestor, Lucy Ann Leyburn LeBus, has been quite a challenge. It seems quite likely that her family experienced a harsh existence. When Annie was a young teen her mother was quite ill, so it is likely she had to assume added household and childcare responsibilities. Annie married when she was 17 years old. By our standards this seems quite young, even though it was more common at that time. Her sister, Jennie, says in her memoir that this marriage greatly upset their parents. Annie gave birth to 13 children within twenty-six years, losing two of those children to death. During those years John and Annie moved several times and we know how difficult travel was at that time – long and arduous.

Note: When naming a first born son, it was often the custom to use the paternal grandmother’s maiden surname. George and Ethel “Pa and Ma” LeBus named their first son, Frank Leyburn.

When I consider what life would have been like for women like Annie, I am astounded at their strength and bravery. Most women were as courageous and hard-working as the men. Their daily tasks were basic but necessary – rearing children, cooking meals, fetching water, sewing clothes, growing gardens, and washing laundry. Even though I know so little about Annie’s life, much less her personality or temperament, I would like to think that she was like the wife described in Proverbs.

A capable wife who can find? She is far more precious than jewels. The heart of her husband trusts in her, and he will have no lack of gain. She does him good, and not harm, all the days of her life. Proverbs 31: 10-12

Sources

Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009.

Ancestry.com. 1880 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.

Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2004.

Clay County, marriage certificate, Clay County Clerk’s Office, Louisville, Illinois.

Harris, Jennie Leyburn, “History of my family and events in my own life.”

Keeling, Susan, “Notes on the Leyburn Family.”

Web: Oklahoma, Find A Grave Index, 1800-2012.

Wikipedia, the free enclyclopedia, “Indiana in the American Civil War,”http://en.Wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_in_the_American_Civil_War

Written by Lucy Ann Nance Croft 2010, Updated November 2013.

 

John Blackburn LeBus

John Blackburn LeBus

John Blackburn LeBus was born December 7, 1850, in Columbiana County, Ohio, the third child of Andrew and Margaret Simmington LeBus. Even though information on the LeBus family is limited, we know from census records that his father was born in Largitzen, Alsace, France, and his mother was born in Ohio. Nevertheless, I think we can rightfully say that John and his siblings were among the first generation Americans.

Agriculture was a principal industry in Columbiana County in the years John’s family lived there, but there were other small varieties of business and manufacturing developing such as grist and flour mills, sawmills, and paper mills. We know from the 1860 U.S. Federal Census information that Andrew LeBus was a blacksmith by trade. (John would later follow in his footsteps.)

By 1860 the LeBus family is living in Wayne County, Illinois, and they have added to their fold. Listed on the 1860 United States Federal Census are Andrew and Margaret Labus (note misspelled name) and their seven children: Mary A. (14), Thomas (12), John (10), George (8), Jackson (6), Ida L. (4), and Nancy E. (1).

I have found no military record of John’s father, Andrew, enlisting in the Civil War, but like all people at that time, they must have been impacted by it. Here is an excerpt from an article in the USGenWeb Archives entitled, “Life in Wayne County during the Civil War, Wayne County, Illinois.”

 When the call reached Wayne County there was great excitement. All the loyal men hurriedly met to make plans to go to Mt. Vernon to enlist. But first, they must decide how their families should be cared for and protected during their absence.

They agreed that those with some physical disability and the few physicians should remain to protect and defend the homes and families if it should be necessary. Also, the crops must be put in for food and it would require some who were able bodied to organize the young boys and girls and plant and care for each farm.

At this time, many of the community sympathized with the Southerners and they called a meeting and organized a society called ‘The Knights of the Golden Circle’ to act as spies against the Northern men, and hinder them in every way possible and to give assistance to the Southern Army…

To combat this marauding society, the Union League was organized. A meeting was called at the home of Syria J. Branson and by unanimous vote he was elected to be captain of the League.

This gives us a small glimpse of the chaotic atmosphere. The Civil War was being waged between states and within communities. We have heard about families and family members turning against each other, and that must have been the case in Wayne County, Illinois. It makes me wonder how John’s father reacted to this situation. Was he a supporter of the Union or the Confederacy?

Sometime before 1870 the LeBus family moved to Flora, Clay County, Illinois. According to the 1870 United States Federal Census, John was listed as 19 years old and his occupation was given as “Blacksmith.” Along with his parents, seven other siblings are listed. Three more LeBus children were born since the 1860 census – Lydia (7), Lincoln (5), and Joseph (1).

JOHN BLACKBURN MARRIES LUCY ANN LEYBURN

John met his bride-to-be in Flora, and her name was Lucy Ann “Annie” Leyburn. They married October 6, 1872. By 1874 they had started their family with the birth of a daughter, Maggie. During the next six years their family grew even more with the births of George Franklin, December 14, 1876; Archie, 1877; and Laura, 1878.

By 1880 John, Annie, and their family were living in Loudon, Tennessee. Perhaps they moved there to be near her siblings. From information on the 1880 United States Federal Census, John (listed as J.A. Lebus) is continuing his trade as a blacksmith. Along with Annie (24) the children are listed as Marie (should be Maggie), Archie,

George and Leif (should be Link).This fourth child, Lincoln, was given the nickname “Link.” For some reason, their daughter Laura is not shown on the census record.

The 1890 United States Federal Census is no longer in existence. Only a few fragments survived a fire at the Commerce Department in Washington, D.C. on January 10, 1921. Neither Indiana nor Illinois have records serving as a census substitute. Therefore, there is a large span of time where I have no recorded information for John and Annie LeBus.

There is no record of why the LeBus family returned to Illinois or where they resided, but from information on the 1900 United States Federal Census, we know that three more of their children were born in Illinois. John Ervin was born December 24, 1881 in Illinois; Ruby was born 1886 in Illinois; and Goldie was born 1888 in Illinois.

JOHN, ANNIE AND FAMILY MOVE TO PERRY, OKLAHOMA

By 1900 the LeBus family is living in Perry, Noble County, Oklahoma. The family name is shown on the 1900 United States Federal Census as Labus. Listed are John B. Labus (50), Anna Labus (45), Ruby Labus (13), Golle (11), Beatrice Labus (7), Irene Labus (4), and John Labus (19). Both Beatrice and Irene were born in Oklahoma.

I am sure John’s life was drastically altered when his wife, Annie, died July 16, 1905. However, John can be found on the 1910 United States Federal Census and he had remarried. Though the name is spelled “Leber,” there is a John Leber, age 59. He was born in Ohio, and his father was born in France. His wife is listed as Clarence Leber, age 52. It shows that they have been married two years. John Leber’s occupation is shown as “Blacksmith.” Census information shows his two youngest daughters, Beatrice and Irene, were living with their sister Laura and her husband, Edward Bullock, in Coal Creek, Pawnee, Oklahoma.

John Blackburn LeBus died December 29, 1915, in Perry, Noble, Oklahoma, and was buried in the Grace Hill Cemetery.

Grave marker for John Blackburn LeBus

Note: George and Ethel “Pa and Ma” LeBus named their second son Jack Blackburn after his paternal grandfather. I have not seen his birth certificate, but it is possible his name was actually John since the name “Jack” is commonly used as a nickname.

I have no record of when John and Annie LeBus arrived in Oklahoma or what attracted them to that area. However, in reading about Noble County in the late 1800’s, I see they may have arrived at a very interesting time in that state’s history. Noble County is located in north-central Oklahoma and was the home of Native Americans for hundreds of years. In 1835 the region became part of the Cherokee Outlet, created by treaty with the Cherokee Nation. During the period of Cherokee ownership, white cattle ranchers of the Cherokee Strip Live Stock Association lease much of the Indian land for grazing.

It was on September 16, 1893, that the famous Oklahoma land run occurred. If the LeBus family was there at the time or participated in the event, it would have been amazing to witness. Here is how a Rev. Fred Belk describes the scene.

 At one minute of 12 o’clock noon on September 16, 1893, a tense silence broken only by the occasional nervous whinny of a horse or braying of a mule fell along the line of the entry of the Cherokee Outlet (Strip). Then, a single shot rang out and one of the most exciting runs’ in the history of the United States began. The silence of the treeless plains were suddenly filled with screaming men, thundering wagons, cracking ships, plunging animals and yapping dogs, and the tidal wave of humanity, surrounded by a cloud of dust, swept towards Perry and its adjoining countryside. They were honest men and thieves, bankers and paupers, adventurers and homesteaders, all wanting some of the virgin land that made the “outlet” famous.

By nightfall, a city of canvas with well over 40,000 population had risen. Estimates are that over 100,000 men, women, and children took part all along the run. The “Strip” as it was later called was 57 miles wide, stretching from the Kansas border to Orlando, and 200 miles long extending to the Texas line and compromising 1/5 of the present state of Oklahoma. Osage, Pawnee, Kay, Noble, Grant, Alfalfa, Major, Woods, Woodward, Harper, and Ellis counties were involved in the “run” and “bread basket” Oklahoma was born.

Sources

Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.

Ancestry.com. 1870 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2003.

Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 1880 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: 2005.

Ancestry.com. 1900 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004.

Ancestry.com. 1910 United States Federal Census [database online]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2006.

Belk, Rev. Fred R., “Early History of Perry, Oklahoma,”  http://www.cityofperryok.com/History.htm

Branson, Mrs. H.L., “The Union League Flag,” Life in Wayne County during the Civil War, Wayne County, Illinois.  http://files.usgwarchives.net/wayne/military/civilwar/civilwar.txt

Clay County, marriage record, Clay County Clerk’s Office, Louisville, Illinois.

“Columbiana County, Ohio,”  http://www.columbianacounty.org/history.htm

Web: Oklahoma, Find A Grave Index, 1800-2012.

Written by Lucy Ann Nance Croft 2010, Updated July 2014.

John B. LeBus Pedigree Chart (click link) John B. LeBus Pedigree Chart

John B. LeBus Family Group Sheet (click link) John B. LeBus FGS – Document